1920-1929


Undeniably, the first film about a haircut.

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One day in the life of a Russian city. It's all movement and montage, but other than its being another variation on cinema as a vehicle for the political (the medium is the message), there's nothing to see here.

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I first watched this so long ago that I'm not in a position to review it. It's not out of copyright, and DVDs start at about £12, so I'm not yet in a position to watch it either.

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One of the most famous shots in silent comedy history (inspired the writings of Kazuo Ishiguro, so the man himself reports) is but one from one the most famous sequences in film comedy history, the windy climax to a familiar plot of boy falls for girl from reviled family foe. Definitely worth the wait.

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That's two hours of my life I'm never getting back. Nanook of the East meets October, but with so little attention paid to credibility or historical accuracy, the product is risible.

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Falconetti hogs the camera and the reputation of the movie, but there is more to admire besides. If only I could be sure I saw the version Dreyer intended.

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Famous for the opening sequence containing the image of an eyeball being cut with a razor, there's a further 15-20 minutes of absurdity that ends with a less well known, but equally arresting and puzzling image. Watch to the end!

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Unvarnished actors play unvarnished roles in unappealing tale of love, treachery and redemption. Nice photography, but I think I can survive without seeing this one again.

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Some funny gags, but too sentimental by half. I'm not going to track down the rest of Harold Lloyd's repertoire.

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Not to mention the issue of having a spare five and a half hours...

The first talkie - allegedly - though first 'singie' might be nearer the mark. There's about as much talking in this as there is in a show by Marcel Marceau.

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